Saturday, April 11, 2009

Recovery

Add this to the list of lessons learned from running 100K: do not follow 13 days later with a marathon. I have been worn out and constantly tired since last weekend's race. I went for a run four times this week, just an easy five miler each time. And every time, the first three miles felt great, and the last two miles felt like the end of a marathon. Then I take a nap, and still find myself dragging through the rest of the day. I even passed on a planned 18 mile trail run with Eric, Rob, Steve and Jenny, and the amazing thing about that is that is was easy to opt out. I usually struggle with having to miss a run, but not this time.

My next marathon is Tacoma on May 3rd, followed by another on the 16th. I'm determined to be rested and running well by then. My plan is simple - run five days a week, five miles at a time. Nothing longer - I figure I've got the base miles, now it's all about bouncing back. And that includes eating well and plenty of sleep.

Life has a funny way of throwing challenges our way when we least need them. We've been handed a new one this week, and it knocked me back a step or two. It's part of the reason I was determined to get out for my daily runs - that need to let some stress go, to find peace in the rhythm of my feet hitting the ground, in the deep breathing and the silky morning air sliding by. I've regained my sense of balance and feel optimistic once again, and I attribute some of that to running. It also serves to remind me of the value of friends and that there are times that we need to set aside our independence and accept all the wonders that friendship has to offer. And finally, as in all adversity, it reminded me that the man who walks beside me is a man of amazing spirit and strength.

All in all, it's been a week, and I'm ready to move past it and on to the next.

16 comments:

Annette said...

Sounds like you have been worn out! I'm glad you passed on the long run and area slowing down a bit. Good luck with your preparation for Tacoma and in dealing with your latest challenge.

Irene said...

I don't know how you do it, all those big mileage runs, but you do need some rest!

I loved the last (second to the last?)paragraph.

bagelsong said...

Doesn't life have a funny way of forcing us to slow down and breathe sometimes? Just so you know, you've inspired me a little this week. On my week day runs, I was tempted to skip out, using Yakima as an excuse..but then I thought about the fact that you've done a 100k AND a marathon and you're still managing to get your butt out there...I have no excuse! Thanks for the "push". :)

Jenny, Maniac #401 said...

Good attitude girl! Hold onto it. I knew you'd be glad you statyed home after our very first bout with the snow. It was NOT easy to run let alone move through and there was a ton if it. We thought of you at coffee all warm and done with your run! Have a great Easter at home with your hubby! Rest up!
Jenny

jessica said...

it is amazing how we are thrown challenges - but we always seen to get through them, for you running is the key - keep it up. Your plan sound very sound, rest up before Tacoma. I got out this morning for the first time this week and it felt amazing - a little tough, but amazing! Keep your chin up, we can all make it through tough times - let's head to the daffodil fields tomorrow, run and chat...

lizzie lee said...

Dear Michelle, I am taking your words one by one, in quotes. I hope "to find peace in the rhythm of my feet hitting the ground, in the deep breathing and the silky morning air sliding by". I hope to regain "my sense of balance and feel optimistic once again" and I will "attribute some of that to running."

Happy Easter.

Bret said...

I hear ya Michelle. I thought I was all the way back too. I would go out and work in the yard for a bit and my legs felt so fatigued just bending over and stretching them. I think as we grow as ultra-runners we forget what our bodies are having to do for us. I know I do!
I think Gail and I are going to Spokane next weekend to do the River Run 50k. Hopefully we will both be ready by then. Happy Easter to you, Eric and your family.

Sunshine said...

Congratulations again on that long run.
Best wishes for recovery.. and challenges.
You are a winner.

Wes said...

Thanks for the reminder... We have to recover just as smart as we train!!

Sorry to hear life reached up and slapped ya! You two are a strong wonderful team, but please let me know if I can help...

Donald said...

No surprise that you hit the wall after those two events. Best wishes to you and Eric with your new challenge.

Joe said...

Great post, as usual, Michelle.

The step-back times of running also reflect the step-back seasons of life.

Much to learn in these moments and you are a life-long learner!!

Enjoy your new week!

Jack said...

Hang in there, let Eric and friends help carry the burden. Enjoy each new day as it comes.

robtherunner said...

Sorry to hear about the latest challenge. Get those daily runs in to keep the stress away. I think your plan is an excellent one.

Anne said...

I got hit hard by an unexpected turn of fate too and am still reeling from it, but also running off the associated stress like you are. You know from reading one of my last posts that I'm a big endorser of recovery, so I hope that yours goes as you plan.

Dori said...

I can hear the tiredness in your post. Sounds like a good plan, cutting back to 25 miles a week. I hope this week is going better for you than last week did.

scott keeps running said...

I'm always tired just reading about how much you run.